International exhibitions

International 2010 Archives


Priscila De Carvalho, (in)Visible Cities
Jamaica Center, New York (USA)

24.06 - 21.08.2010
















 











































































































07.09 - 25.11.2012
































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Press release


Priscila De Carvalho’s (In)visible Cities will open on June 24th at the Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning Gallery (JCAL) and will feature new works created during her 2009-2010 Workspace Artist Residency at JCAL.

"From one angle to another, the invisibility of these cities seems to continue, in lights, ‘in perspective, multiplying its repertory of images: but instead it has no thickness, it consists only of a face and an obverse, like a sheet of paper, with a figure on either side, which can neither be separated nor look at each other."







 


































Priscila De Carvalho, (in)Visible Cities, Jamaica Center, New York

© ArtCatalyse International / Marika Prévosto 2012. All Rights Reserved

Exhibition June 24th - August 21st 2010. Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning Gallery, 161-04 Jamaica Avenue, Jamaica, NY 11432 - New York. Phone: 718-658-7400.




Priscila De Carvalho, (In)visible Cities, installation views at Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning Gallery (JCAL) New York, 2010 © Photo courtesy of the artist

Priscila De Carvalho, (In)visible Cities, installation views at Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning Gallery (JCAL) New York, 2010 © Photo courtesy of the artist


Priscila De Carvalho, excerpt from Invisible Cities by Italo Calvino


(In)visible Cities is a site-specific installation for the Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning gallery. In our era of globalization and technical advancement, the stratification between the rich and the poor is ever increasing and global poverty is often hidden by the glorious spectacles and futuristic prospects of media. De Carvalho’s project points out the ever growing poverty on the global level and raises the question of what to do.


The installation consists of a few large-scale paintings of mixed media and an installation of bridge structures that connects the paintings together. The bridge structures, built from wood, depict winding, irregular paths and stairways, referencing the ever-present stairways in the slums of Brazil. The mixed-media paintings are made of recycled materials, wood, house paint, and collaged photographs taken in Queens.


Upon entering the gallery, visitors are confronted by a chaotic, complex and paradoxical world where finding your way can be simultaneously treacherous and stimulating.